That is just perverse

I was reading an article in The Washington Post about Aretha Franklin’s funeral service and came across this bit of information “She was wearing a full-length gold dress, the final of four outfits she was changed into throughout the week’s public viewings.

Seriously? A corpse had 4 costume changes? I can’t even.

I think funerals are weird, beginning with funeral homes and viewings, and open caskets. I understand the emotional need some people may have to see the corpse – closure and all that. Seeing is believing, they are really dead, and all of that. But – I don’t want to participate – in any way, living or dead. I don’t want to see, or be seen.

What is the point? Why do you want to keep a dead body around? And dress it up, with make-up – like some kind of, what, gross Barbie doll? Once a person dies, and their soul leaves their body, what’s left isn’t anything more than a chunk of meat. The only reason you would “dress” up a chunk a meat is if you were planning to cook and eat it. We don’t do that, we don’t cook and eat other humans.

Same goes for burial – cemeteries are basically pretty landfills for dead humans. What a waste of space!

I absolutely believe in remembering our loved ones – with a whiz bang of a party, with reminiscences and stories – you talk about them, all the time – that’s how you keep people alive – you celebrate their lives not their deaths. You honor your dead by remembering them.

When I die, you can just haul my carcass directly to the crematorium, takes the ashes and scatter them to the wind. Actually, ashes are good for roses, so spread them around a yellow rose bush and help it grow and bloom.  My husband always said that he would take my ashes to New York City and surreptitiously scatter my ashes throughout Central Park.

That works for me.

6 thoughts on “That is just perverse

  1. Costume changes for a corpse is pretty bizarre. Wade had always told me he wanted to be cremated and his ashes scattered over Kinzua Dam on the Allegheny river. Part of his ashes were buried by his mother but some went exactly where he wanted them.
    I really haven’t given much thought to what I would want done with me when I did. I suppose it makes no difference. I think if I’m cremated though my ashes should either be dumped in a craft store or maybe at a craft show

    Liked by 1 person

    1. And the expense of funerals – just so you can put on a show? For whom? Funerals, cemeteries, the whole ‘death’ show is for the living, not the dead. And then the living think, “There, our obligation is done” but it’s not – the active remembering is the work of the living.

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  2. I don’t understand some cultures and this corpse clothing change thing has me baffled. I learned early on with my dad’s passing that people don’t visit cemeteries anymore. Why waste the space on such silliness? Nah…me, I’m going to be cremated and my ashes scattered at my favorite spot in the world–the back patio of the lodge at Cumberland Falls. I want my family to come there after I’m dead and gone to remember me….and enjoy that incredible view and glorious scent.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I hadn’t heard about the clothing changes. That’s just weird. I don’t like seeing dead bodies in a casket. The first one I saw was when I was a kid and the younger brother of one of my friends died of cancer. He was 8 and the sight of him in the casket is still in my head after all these years. I now avoid looking at the body even at my grandparents that have passed. Nope. Don’t want to remember them that way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I suppose because the body was on view for 4 days and the body used ti belong to someone famous they figured as in death, so as in life and kept her clothing fresh and updated. I guess it was a show biz thing.

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